'I felt like an outcast' – Spencer, Day explain MVP split

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Ricardo Makyn
National athletes Kaleise Spencer (right) and Christine Day, new members of the Cameron Blazers Track Club, react during an interview with The Gleaner yesterday.

Kaliese Spencer said she felt like an “outcast”, while Christine Day spoke of a “break-up” text

message.

However, as the two athletes broke their silence about their split from the Stephen Francis-led MVP Track Club, it’s clear they have little doubt about the move they have since made.

Spencer and Day, who both said they felt they were not getting the desired attention, have also expressed confidence in their move, having swapped the MVP Track Club for Bert Cameron – the 1983 World champion in the 400m – and his Cameron Blazers outfit.

The Olympians, who for 10 years were guided by the highly-regarded Francis, yesterday spoke to The Gleaner about the developments, while outlining the circumstances around the break-up that dominated headlines last week.

“Maybe I outgrew him (Francis) and I didn’t feel I was needed any longer; let’s put it that way, I was like an outcast really,” said a relaxed-looking Spencer yesterday.

“I just needed a different environment to be more relaxed, I was just not comfortable anymore, and I believe this change will work to my advantage,” she added.

Spencer, who with 21 wins in the 400m hurdles on the Diamond League circuit, is the most successful track athlete in the history of the series, thanked and credited Francis for her success.

“First I must say, it (decision to leave MVP) had nothing to do with Christine (Day). I was there for 10 years and was getting a little uncomfortable, so I came to the conclusion that I was moving to a different stage in my life and it was just time for a change and time to move on,” said Spencer.

She also paid a lot of credit to Francis and noted she was expecting to have a meeting with the MVP management team before she left, admitting, however, that she had already decided to leave two days before Francis came on local television and stated that she was no longer a part of the club.

Prayed before decision

“This is something I prayed about before I even made my choice,” added Spencer, the 2014 Commonwealth Games champion and World Indoor Championships 400m silver medal winner.

She also explained her reasons behind choosing to work with Cameron.

“I just thought that he was a very kind person. He has a great personality, always encouraging us, even though we were not a part of his club. He always motivated us and that really helped in my decision. Of course, he also did the 400m, is an Olympian and World champion, so that was a great part,” admitted Spencer.

“I have seen how he (Cameron) works with his athletes and the attention he gives them, and I know I will improve,” Day chipped in.

Day also shared that she was actually told by Francis via text message after this summer’s IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Beijing, China, that he would not be able to train her anymore.

The Commonwealth Games bronze medal winner informed The Gleaner that this came after a conversation she had with the coach after her win at the National Senior Championships in June, which led to a disagreement and strained relations between the two.

“It wasn’t concrete and he gave it a few days to think about it and I had to prove to him that I could be the same person I was when I just stepped into UTech,” she explained.

“We were supposed to have another meeting, but we didn’t; he sent a text message to say he did not change his mind,” Day recounted.

Happy with choice

Day is happy with her choice to join the Cameron Blazers and thanked Francis for his contribution to her development.

“Honestly, I am not disappointed and I am looking forward to the future,” she said.

“I thank Mr Francis for all the years he coached me, but I am now looking to the future,” added Day, who ran a personal best 50.14 seconds for fourth place at the recently concluded World Championships in Beijing, China, in August.

Cameron, who is working alongside administrator Marvin Anderson to continue the club’s improvements, added that he is looking forward to the experience and challenge in working with the two athletes. He believes that together, they will be able to meet their objectives.

Day and Spencer are expected to join their Cameron Blazers teammates, including Leford Green, Jaheel Hyde and Martin Manley.

'I felt like an outcast' – Spencer, Day explain MVP split

Ricardo Makyn
National athletes Kaleise Spencer (right) and Christine Day, new members of the Cameron Blazers Track Club, react during an interview with The Gleaner yesterday.

Kaliese Spencer said she felt like an “outcast”, while Christine Day spoke of a “break-up” text

message.

However, as the two athletes broke their silence about their split from the Stephen Francis-led MVP Track Club, it’s clear they have little doubt about the move they have since made.

Spencer and Day, who both said they felt they were not getting the desired attention, have also expressed confidence in their move, having swapped the MVP Track Club for Bert Cameron – the 1983 World champion in the 400m – and his Cameron Blazers outfit.

The Olympians, who for 10 years were guided by the highly-regarded Francis, yesterday spoke to The Gleaner about the developments, while outlining the circumstances around the break-up that dominated headlines last week.

“Maybe I outgrew him (Francis) and I didn’t feel I was needed any longer; let’s put it that way, I was like an outcast really,” said a relaxed-looking Spencer yesterday.

“I just needed a different environment to be more relaxed, I was just not comfortable anymore, and I believe this change will work to my advantage,” she added.

Spencer, who with 21 wins in the 400m hurdles on the Diamond League circuit, is the most successful track athlete in the history of the series, thanked and credited Francis for her success.

“First I must say, it (decision to leave MVP) had nothing to do with Christine (Day). I was there for 10 years and was getting a little uncomfortable, so I came to the conclusion that I was moving to a different stage in my life and it was just time for a change and time to move on,” said Spencer.

She also paid a lot of credit to Francis and noted she was expecting to have a meeting with the MVP management team before she left, admitting, however, that she had already decided to leave two days before Francis came on local television and stated that she was no longer a part of the club.

Prayed before decision

“This is something I prayed about before I even made my choice,” added Spencer, the 2014 Commonwealth Games champion and World Indoor Championships 400m silver medal winner.

She also explained her reasons behind choosing to work with Cameron.

“I just thought that he was a very kind person. He has a great personality, always encouraging us, even though we were not a part of his club. He always motivated us and that really helped in my decision. Of course, he also did the 400m, is an Olympian and World champion, so that was a great part,” admitted Spencer.

“I have seen how he (Cameron) works with his athletes and the attention he gives them, and I know I will improve,” Day chipped in.

Day also shared that she was actually told by Francis via text message after this summer’s IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Beijing, China, that he would not be able to train her anymore.

The Commonwealth Games bronze medal winner informed The Gleaner that this came after a conversation she had with the coach after her win at the National Senior Championships in June, which led to a disagreement and strained relations between the two.

“It wasn’t concrete and he gave it a few days to think about it and I had to prove to him that I could be the same person I was when I just stepped into UTech,” she explained.

“We were supposed to have another meeting, but we didn’t; he sent a text message to say he did not change his mind,” Day recounted.

Happy with choice

Day is happy with her choice to join the Cameron Blazers and thanked Francis for his contribution to her development.

“Honestly, I am not disappointed and I am looking forward to the future,” she said.

“I thank Mr Francis for all the years he coached me, but I am now looking to the future,” added Day, who ran a personal best 50.14 seconds for fourth place at the recently concluded World Championships in Beijing, China, in August.

Cameron, who is working alongside administrator Marvin Anderson to continue the club’s improvements, added that he is looking forward to the experience and challenge in working with the two athletes. He believes that together, they will be able to meet their objectives.

Day and Spencer are expected to join their Cameron Blazers teammates, including Leford Green, Jaheel Hyde and Martin Manley.

FLOW Super Cup Tournament launched in Mobay

FLOW Super Cup Tournament launched in Mobay

by Wayde Brown

The 2015 ISSA FLOW Super Cup was on Tuesday officially launched at the Montego Bay Convention Center in Rose Hall, St. James.

A total of 16 teams will take part in what will essentially be the contest between the best teams in the rural area facing their corporate area counterparts in a 4-week long knockout tournament.

The competition gets underway from October 24 and comes to an end on November 14. It will be played across three venues: Catherine Hall, Sabina Park and National Stadium.

It will be contested by a total of 16 teams – the 8 Inter-Zone round winners from the DaCosta Cup and 7 first round group winners and best second placed team from the Manning Cup.

Each of the 16 qualifying team stands to receive $25,000 with each of the 8 quarterfinalist set to take home another $50,000.

The four teams making it to the semifinals will earn $100,000 each with the two finalists pocketing $200,000 each and the winner set to take home $625,000.

Atop the list is a total prize pot of approximately $2.5 million for participating schools along with an individual ‘Golden Boot’ prize, improved jersey kits provided by overseas apparel sponsor Nike and several plans to increase public access to the games via live television broadcast.

The new FLOW Super Cup trophy was manufactured in Italy and weighs approximately 24lbs.

sbfchampionsleague

The new cup will be handed to the winner of the ISSA/FLOW Super Cup scheduled to conclude on November 14 along with a cheque for $1 million.

The draw for the tournament is scheduled to take place on October 22 while games will be played as double and triple headers at each venue on the various match days.

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AUDIO: I felt like an outcast, says former MVP athlete Kaliese Spencer

Ricardo Makyn
Olympians Christine Day (left) and Kaliese Spencer.

Olympians Kaliese Spencer and Christine Day have made their first public comments since news broke last week that they were leaving the Stephen Francis-led MVP Track Club.

The athletes who have since joined Bert Cameron’s ‘Cameron Blazers’ have thanked Francis for his decade-long guidance, but say they were not getting the desired attention at the University of Technology-based MVP Track Club.

“I felt like an outcast,” said Spencer 400m hurdles gold medal winner at the 2014 Commonwealth Games and one of the most successful athletes in the history of the IAAF Diamond League.

Day, the national 400m champion and World Championships finalist, said she too felt uncomfortable remaining at MVP.

 

Kaliese Spencer and Christine Day speaking Andre Lowe

“I know I will improve,” she said, adding that she is satisfied with the attention that Cameron gives his athletes. “I am looking forward to the future,” she said.

In the meantime, the athletes say the way in which they separated from MVP was regrettable.

According to Day, following two meetings with Francis, he informed her via a text message that he would not continue to train her.

She said during the meeting, Francis asked her to prove that she could repeat her performance on joining the club 10 years ago and said he would give her time to think about it.

But she said before she could respond, Francis sent her the text message advising that the relationship had ended.

Meanwhile, Spencer said two days after deciding she would not return to MVP, Francis appeared on television announcing that their relationship had ended.

But Spencer said she had no discussions whatsoever with Francis.

“I thought that he was going to have a meeting with me, I heard he was going to, but nobody from the MVP management team got back to me, I just saw him on the television talking to me,” Spencer said.

Calabar overcome tough Tivoli challenge

Jermaine Barnaby
Calabar High School's Tafari Anderson (right) and Tivoli High School's Daniel Martin challenge for a header during their Group A ISSA/ FLOW Manning Cup football fixture at the Edward Seaga Sports Complex yesterday. Calabar won 3-1.

Familiar with what it takes to reach the second round of the ISSA/FLOW Manning Cup football competition, 2005 champions Calabar High saw off the physical and tactical challenges of lowly Tivoli with a 3-1win at the Edward Seaga Sports Complex yesterday.

Mickel Graham sent them ahead four minutes into the match with a powerful close-range finish, while Lenworth Reckford finished off what could go down as the goal of the match via a 19-yard free-kick, which sizzled and sailed into the back of the net in stoppage time of the first half (45 plus one minute).

The half-time score was 2-1 in favour of Calabar, which scored their third goal inside 58 minutes, as Roman Rallyns capitalised on a bad giveaway by goalkeeper Romane McKenzie.

Tivoli’s consolation was scored through a 42nd-minute penalty, after Renardo Burgher was adjudged to slap Rajeem Lothian inside the penalty box. Dwayne Coke subsequently fired in low and hard.

The result means that Calabar pulled into second position in Group A on 10 points, the same as defending champions Jamaica College, who have a superior goal

difference.

It took the Red Hills Road-based school six games to qualify for the second round, while Jamaica College have played four, with three wins and one draw.

Yesterday’s game was a tense battle which saw both teams concede possession and give up numerous fouls, eight yellow cards in total and a red card to goalscorer Dwayne Coke for a rash tackle late in the game.

Of Calabar’s three wins, two losses and one draw, coach Bradley Stewart said he is “not necessarily satisfied”.

“(We’ve) what we think is probably enough to take us to the next round, and we hope that by virtue of having this little rest period, we will get back to a better situation,” he added.

Stewart added that the break will give them a chance to recuperate and get the players back to their best.

Meanwhile, Tivoli’s coach said his young team, though eliminated, will be “rebuilding for next season”.

Arnett women ambush St Mary Rangers 2-0

Ian Allen
Bailey … scored seven goals for Arnett.

The 2015-16 Jamaica Football Federation (JFF)/Sherwin Williams Women’s League kicked off with a total of 52 goals in five matches last Sunday.

Last season’s beaten finalists, Arnett Gardens FC, accounted for most of the goals when they flooded Rangers FC of St Mary 24-0 at the Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex.

National representative Shantel Bailey scored seven times, leading the way with goals in the 23rd, 30th, 54th, 56th, 73rd, 76th and 88th minutes. Other scorers were Shanel Spence with a four-timer (2nd, 6th, 10th, 12th), Asheina Nelson (27th, 37th, 57th) and Kadian Edwards (24th, 47th, 65th) with hat-tricks, Abbygale Adams (78th, 83rd), Abby O’Hara (4th, 41st), Annakay Richards (32nd), Shakira Douglas (60th) and Tamara O’Sullivan (90th).

In another high-scoring game, Olympic Gardens swamped Boys’ Town FC 10-0 at Collie Smith Drive. Sabrina Berry hit home a hat-trick in the 11th, 64th and 66th minutes. Berry was supported by goals from Renee Scott (34th, 44th), Alicia Mullings (43rd, 74th), Courtni Smith (86th, 89th) and Stacy Ann Johnson (41st).

Waterhouse were also on a goal spree, when they slammed St James FC 9-0 at Waterhouse Stadium.

Shanell Martin hit a five-timer in the 10th, 16th, 65th, 69th and 90th minutes. Christina Murray netted a hat-trick (6th, 38th, 73rd) and Jameica Henry also scored, in the 48th minute.

Los Perfectos FC of Manchester defeated Trelawny Women’s FC 7-1. Venecia Reid scored five goals, netting in the 27th, 45th, 51st, 75th and 77th minutes. Sashalee Cooper (16th) and Sashan Campbell (88th0 also got on the scoresheet. Kemecia Conroy scored the lone goal for the losers, in the 70th minute.

In a low-scoring match, defending champions Barbican FC edged G C Foster College FC 1-0 at Barbican Complex. Keneshia Reid scored the only goal in the 19th minute.

Jennifer Ellison-Brown: History and development of PE and sports

File
Wint, won Jamaica's first Olympic gold medal

 

The Olympic Games

 

The first Olympic Games were heavily based on religion and were tributes to the gods of ancient Greece.

The Games can be traced as far back as 776 BC and were held every four years in Olympia, Greece, until 393 AD when they were banned by a Christian, Emperor Theodosius I, who saw them as pagan festivals.

The ancient Olympics were also an opportunity to show the abilities of young people and to promote good relationships among competing cities. A truce was declared during the Games. all fighting had to stop. Married women were strictly forbidden to watch the Games.

The Games initially lasted one day but gradually went to three and then five days of competition. The events included athletics, boxing, wrestling, pentathlon (which consisted of three running races, jumping, and discus throw), chariot racing, equestrian events, and the pancratium, a violent combination of boxing and wrestling. Winners were given laurel wreaths and palm branches, which were highly regarded.

 

The modern Olympics

 

In 1894, Baron Pierre de Coubertin became inspired by a number of events that were held, all claiming to be a revival of the Olympic Games. This led him to set up the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which initiated the modern Olympic Games.

The baron had been impressed by the Games he had seen in the English public schools and the athleticism they generated. He wanted to improve the physical health of his countrymen and thought the Olympic Games would be a good way to do it.

The first Games took place in Athens, Greece, in 1896, and 241 male athletes from 14 countries competed in nine sports.

Today, the Olympic Games are the world’s biggest and most famous sporting event. Held every four years – with both summer and winter sports competition – the aim is to promote the ideals of

ï Personal excellence

ï Sport as education

ï Cultural exchange

ï Mass participation

ï Fair play

ï International understanding.

The IOC works to ensure that a lasting legacy is developed, helping the host cities to change their community for the better. They are also working with developing countries to help with expansion of sporting programmes, focusing on education and sports, peace and sports, women and sports, and sports and the environment.

The Olympic values of excellence, respect, and friendship are of huge importance before, during, and after the event. The last Olympic Games, in 2012, were held in London, England and 204 countries took part in 26 sports. The next Olympics will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2016, followed by Tokyo, Japan, in 2020.

Past Olympic Games

1896 Athens

1900 Paris

1904 St Louis

1908 London

1912 Stockholm

1916 cancelled (World War I)

1920 Antwerp

1924 Paris

1928 Amsterdam

1932 Los Angeles

1936 Berlin

1940-1944 cancelled (World

War II)

1948 London

1952 Helsinki

1956 Melbourne

1960 Rome

1964 Tokyo

1968 Mexico City

1976 Montreal

1980 Moscow

1984 Los Angeles

1988 Seoul

1992 Barcelona

1996 Atlanta

2000 Sydney

2004 Athens

2008 Beijing

2012 London

The IOC chooses the host city through its members’ votes. Cities, not countries, put their names forward.

A number of scandals showed a great deal of bribery was involved in the selection process and new rules were introduced by the IOC in 1999. Cities cannot now be accepted as official candidates until the IOC executive board is satisfied that they are properly prepared and in line with IOC guidelines. Visits by IOC members to such cities and gifts to IOC members are banned.

All summer Olympics since 1984 have made a healthy profit. plus, there is status and publicity for both the city and country. They must improve their facilities as well as roads, transportation system, guest accommodation, and tourist attractions. Holding the Olympics provides other commercial opportunities because of the large influx of competitors and spectators during the Games.

 

Caribbean’s Olympic history

 

Cuba was the first Caribbean country documented to have entered the Summer Olympic Games, doing so in 1900 in Paris. They won two medals – one gold and a silver – in fencing.

Haiti entered in 1924, but it was not until 1948 that teams from a number of Caribbean countries, including Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, participated.

Arthur Wint won Jamaica’s first gold medal, and Rodney Wilkes won a weightlifting bronze for Trinidad and Tobago.

In 1998, a meeting of Caribbean delegates took place to discus Caribbean Olympism, and the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees was established.

Oral Tracy: Shame on Schafer

AP
Schafer … Will be suspended for the first two games of the semi-final round of the Russia 2018 World Cup Qualifying campaign.

THE SUSPENSION of Reggae Boyz coach Winfried Schäfer fC

The specific offence of unsporting behaviour against a match official will cost the German his place on the bench for the games against Panama at home and Haiti away. Looking at the circumstances under which the offence itself was committed, I think it was totally unnecessary, unbecoming, and absolutely unforgivable for a coach of Schäfer’s experience.

Don’t get me wrong. I love to see my technical leader involved, expressive and passionate while going about his job, but he has got to be controlled and smart about it, especially when so much is at stake. The point in the game at which the Jamaican bench flared up with indiscretion was when the Reggae Boyz had just seized control of their destiny.

The crucial second goal scored by Simon Dawkins with less than five minutes of regulation time remaining was actually being celebrated when Lance Laing got yellow carded, then reacted, and got a red.

Schäfer ’s impulsive reaction to that sequence of events landed him and the entire campaign in the current hot water. That’s not what is expected from such a senior and experienced coach who has seen and done it all at this level. Calm, cerebral leadership, and astute situational analysis is what is expected in those crucial minutes counting down to the Boyz achieving the bigger objective of advancing to the semi-final round.

One could understand this kind of irrational reaction if the Jamaicans had not yet got the goal and were staring at World Cup elimination, or if the Jamaicans had been victims of bad refereeing decisions and reacted negatively. In those scenarios, if the players and the coach lost their cool out of frustration and desperation – it would be much more understandable. But to go down that road in that moment of glory was nothing short of stupid.

This game was not against one of our more traditional regional rivals such as Mexico, the USA, or Costa Rica. The Jamaicans were playing against Nicaragua, caught in a precarious position – which was all of our own doing – after their disastrous display in the first-leg match at home. There was no room for an emotional meltdown having got so close to the finish line. The mission in Nicaragua was simply to right a temporary wrong against an inferior opponent with our eyes always on the bigger prize. ALL NOT LOST To get suspended in such a fixture when the wider objective was being met is a novice act.

Fortunately, Schäfer’s suspension is exclusive of his presence on the bench and in the dressing room for those first two games. All, therefore, is not lost as the coach will still be allowed to instruct and travel with the team.

If, however, Schäfer ’s absence directly or indirectly results in Jamaica losing crucial ground in this semi-final round in those two early fixtures and eventually exiting the World Cup at this stage, then all fingers should deservedly be pointed at Schäfer and his silly actions in those crucial moments in Managua. Not only would it be shameful on Jamaica and disaster for our football programme, it would even more so be a big shame on Schäfer.

Spike Lee is NYC Marathon grand marshall

AP
Lee

NEW YORK (AP):

He’s a noted filmmaker, a teacher, an honorary Oscar winner, a crazy New York sports fan, and now this: Spike Lee is the next grand marshall of the New York City Marathon.

“It’s gonna be a great day in my life,” Lee said in an interview about his new title. “All those runners, coming from all over the world to New York? It’s gonna be a fun time.”

Lee, 58, is known as one of his hometown’s great boosters, and so it’s apt that he becomes the first New Yorker to get the title of grand marshall.

He’s also only the third person in the race’s 45-year history to have it, race officials said, after Czech running star Emil Zatopek in 1979 and Grete Waitz of Norway – winner of a record nine titles, who died in 2011 – in 2003.

“When we looked at having a grand marshall for this year’s TCS New York City Marathon, we envisioned someone the world would immediately recognise as a sports enthusiast and quintessential New Yorker, and Spike was the perfect fit,” said Michael Capiraso, president and CEO of the New York Road Runners, in a statement.

Lee professes to having no idea why he was chosen for the honour, but notes he’s a lifelong fan of the race, which takes place this year on November 1.

“When I was in college at Morehouse in Atlanta, this was really my New York fix, watching the marathon,” he said. “Because I will go to my grave, you know – hopefully, no time soon – saying that New York City is the greatest city on God’s planet! And I think the marathon is a big demonstration of that, people coming from all over the world, to do their best. There’s no better city in the world to do that than New York City.”

An added bonus for Lee: The race goes through the Fort Greene neighbourhood in Brooklyn, where he grew up and where his film company’s office is now. He used to put his kids in their strollers and greet the runners. As part of his race duties, he’ll ride the 26.2-mile route in the grand marshall’s car.

Lee is known as one of New York’s most avid sports fans for his die-hard support of the New York Knicks and also the Yankees.

Laurie Foster: Mass exodus

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Ricardo Makyn
Stewart
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McLaughlin
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Ricardo Makyn
Christone Day runs at the IAAF World Championships in Beijing, China, in August 2015.
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Foster’s Fairplay is still basking in the afterglow of the XV IAAF Beijing World Championships. Starting with the new paradigm that branded the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Jamaica’s lovers of sports were spellbound by the superlative performances in five world-standard showcases of track and field up to and including the Moscow World Championships two years ago.

At every call, the supporters swelled to proportions that were once again to lose valuable sleep, and possibly jobs, as the viewing vigil at times meant early to mid-morning shifts.

Many of the thrilling moments of the second stint in the Chinese city were predictable – the Usain Bolt recurring phenomenon; Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s now-cemented upper hand on the world’s best female sprinters; and Elaine Thompson’s emergence, with thoughts of a ‘three the tough way’ clash in Rio – and brought added moisture to the palate.

What did not appear in the crystal ball was what coach Lennox Graham would pull from his magician’s bag in Danielle Williams.

Having warmed to all those thrills, now safely tucked away, the cooling-down opportunity was to be embraced just to reflect. As mentioned last week, putting the 2016 Olympics in proper perspective and willing our amazing athletes to greater effort and glory would be the sole focus. Perish that thought at the womb stage! Here comes a mass exodus from the two top clubs whose athletes had sweetened the pot a mere few weeks ago in Beijing.

 

News scanty

 

News coming from the MVP camp is scanty, and not unsurprisingly, non-committal. All that was revealed equalled “I’ll tell you at month end – October”.

Over at Racers, sources, who asked to remain anonymous, say that the problem is efforts to upgrade their female portfolio were falling short. The all-encompassing picture first is that national champion and World Champs 400m fourth-place finisher Christine Day and Beijing 100m finalist Natasha Morrison, both with gold medals in the mile and sprint relays, respectively, have headed out the MVP exit door.

Of lesser quality and impact, back-to-back 200m silver medallist at the World Juniors (2002/2004) Anneisha McLaughlin, later Whilby, has also waved her hand in retreat from her MVP teammates.

Almost simultaneously coming to this columnist, Beijing 2008 Olympics joint 100m silver medallist Kerron Stewart has also packed her bags and said goodbye to Racers. Accompanying her on the move were the too-long-promising duo of sprinter Schillonie Calvert and 400m hurdler Ristananna Tracey. The grapevine, and understandably so, reveals that the club’s bosses were spared the trauma of letters of dismissal – their threatening reaction to below-par performances.

There is no difficulty in saying to the Dr Glen Mills-conditioned trio “that is the end of that” and “wish you well elsewhere”.

Stewart, it must be concluded, has had her time, her most productive days seemingly behind her, although thoughts of that pair of silver medals, being at the time transformed to gold, must be a bothersome factor.

Calvert, despite global sprint relay gold medals in 2013 (Moscow, WC) and 2015 (Nassau, World Relays Championships), has not realised early promise shown at the individual level. And Tracey, who it is claimed has taken on major distractions, qualifies for what the horsemen call “in and out running”. They seem all to have been in the Racers departure lounge.

The University of Technology-based athletes, if they considered their less than impressive high school past, should have been happy, even under the coaching whip of an uncompromising, no-nonsense Stephen Francis.

Day’s WC personal best of 50.14 and Morrison’s similarly described 10.96 in her semi-final show remarkable improvement from the ranks of ‘Miss Nobodys’. Whispers are that their enthusiasm and willingness to compete in Beijing took a nosedive when they resumed the circuit several thousand dollars richer. Given safe landing and embraces in another camp, they could soar to even greater heights.

Foster’s Fairplay is reluctant to take an unnecessary swipe at athletes who brought satisfaction from Beijing. However, the label attendant to the charge of post-World Champ attitude suggests ingratitude for the goodwill extended to escort them there. Be careful now! This exit has revealed a few things previously kept ‘beneath the sheets’. So the heat can ‘tun up’ anytime.